I Am The Brown Eyed Girl.

Lighting the fuse might result in a bang.

makemestfu:

EVERYTHING RELATE

If My Dog Could Talk

Dog:

WAT DOING

Me:

Nothing. I just stood up.

Dog:

WHERE GO

Me:

I'm literally walking 3 feet away. I'm not even leaving the room.

Dog:

CAN I COME

Me:

I mean sure but I'm literally just-

Dog:

I COME TOO

Dog:

WAT DOING

Me:

I need to open this door.

Dog:

I HALP

Me:

No but you're in front of the door. Move please.

Dog:

I HALP

Me:

Sigh.

Dog:

WHERE GOING

Me:

I am going right back to the exact place I was sitting a second ago.

Dog:

CAN I COME

Me:

Sure.

Dog:

I SIT IN LAP

Me:

No please don't you are-

Dog:

I SIT IN LAP

Me:

No there's no room and-

Dog:

LAP

Me:

No, sit on the floor and I'll pet you.

Dog:

RIGHT HERE

Me:

That's literally on top of my leg.

Dog:

IT'S PERFECT PET ME

Me:

I am petting you. One second, let me just grab my glass-

Dog:

PET ME PET ME PET ME PET ME

Me:

I literally am petting you, I just needed a drink-

Dog:

PET ME PET ME PET ME PET ME

Me:

I AM

Dog:

I SIT IN LAP

Dog:

PET ME PET ME PET ME

Dog:

HOLD SLOBBER TOY

Dog:

SNEEZE IN UR FACE

Me:

.......

jewbat:

bombing:

i came out tonight to get attacked and honestly i am having such a fun time right now

(via seasonsofjohnlock)

“Marry someone you want to annoy for the rest of your life.”

—   My mum (via everybodysgotadarkside97)

(via illrememberthat)

“What are the units?”

—   Ancient science proverb (via adventuresinchemistry)

(via smilesandvials)

dylanfuller:

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

What the fuck this is so sad….? what?

(via urnotsoroyalyourself)

My request in progress

studydrawordrink:

since I have to make iamthebrowneyedgirl wait so long for her request, I will post an in progress pic, it has progressed a little from this point (to where it’s less scary…I think) but I don’t have a picture of that, enjoy your nightmares!image

dude this is class!!

thefeministdevelopment:

postwhitesociety:

virgosb:

This.

Wow…..wow

That. That there is an excellent point.

thefeministdevelopment:

postwhitesociety:

virgosb:

This.

Wow…..wow

That. That there is an excellent point.

(Source: carpediemtomorrow, via contagiousdragon)

madelineyo:

pocketspooks:

locksandglasses:

I remember when I thought people in their 20’s were adults. Now all of my friends are in their 20’s and everybody is just kind of fumbling around bumping into each other, trying to figure out where the free food is

image

Excellent gif use

(via shot-gun-sinners)

Pretty much why I started watching Supernatural….

(Source: obsessedwithspn, via hellofandomfeels)

guiseofgentlewords:

guiseofgentlewords:

my father told me once to never date anyone who talks smoothly around you from the start because if someone likes you they should be a little nervous and honestly i think that’s some of the best advice anyone has ever given me

look it’s me!! radical

(via shot-gun-sinners)

poopflow:

james franco look like one of those sweaty stoners that shows up to class late every day and is like “you got another pencil i can use bruh” and he never gives them back what does he do with all those pencils

(via lionquinns)

sciencesoup:

Nucleic Acids
Nucleic acids are the “genetic software” of the cell, allowing organisms to pass on their complex components to the next generation. You might know them better as DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or RNA (ribonucleic acid): the macromolecules responsible for storing and transmitting hereditary information. They’re the reason you have blonde hair, or long fingers, or a gigantic nose. Without them, no organism could produce offspring, so they’re essential for all life.
Nucleic acids are made up of a chain of monomers called nucleotides, which are in turn made up of five-carbon sugars, a nitrogenous base, and one or more phosphate groups. That might seem like an extra level of complication, but we need to know this to understand their structure.
Consider, for example, a DNA molecule:

The two strands running down on either side are called the molecule’s “sugar phosphate backbone”, which are connected in the middle by nitrogenous bases that pair up to the adjacent strand.There are four kinds of bases: Adenine and Guanine, which are purines, and Cytosine and Thymine, which are pyrimidines. In RNA, Thymine is replaced with Uracil (a pyrimidine). Purines have two rings and pyrimidines have one ring, so the groupings just refer to structure.

(Source)
The bases are almost always shortened to A, G, C, T & U. Their order determines how life is built—they encode a sequence of amino acids, which instruct how proteins are built. We’ll learn more about later.
Nitrogenous bases are hydrophobic, meaning they hate water. This is crucial to the structure of the DNA, because the strands are oriented so the bases face each other rather than the outside world, protecting them from water. The bases pair together using hydrogen bonds—purines always pair with pyrimidines, so A pairs with T (U in RNA), and C with G.  In any given DNA molecule, the amount of A equals the amount of T, and the amount of C equals the amount of G. This is important because it maintains a uniform diameter for the helix of DNA.

The person who realised this equality was Austrian biochemist Erwin Chargaff, and he was a contemporary of American biologist James Watson and English physicist Francis Crick, who you might have heard of. In 1953, they were the first to publish the spiralling, double-helix structure of DNA. (See my article on Rosalind Franklin for the reason I’m not a fan of Watson and Crick.)
DNA strands have a polarity, meaning they have a direction—strands are always synthesised from the 5’ (said “five prime”) end to the 3’ end. I’ll talk a whole lot more about how this happens later on. The important thing to know now is that when two strands are connected in a DNA molecule, they run antiparallel, like this:
So, what about an RNA molecule?
For starters, DNA is located in a different place to RNA:

RNA only has a single strand, and it’s made from a different sugar: ribose instead of deoxyribose. Basically, this means it has one more OH group). RNA also has a completely different function. While DNA is the blueprint for life, RNA is the guy who actually gets things done. Different types of RNA are specialised for different functons: mRNA (messenger RNA) carries the blueprints between DNA and ribosomes in order to make proteins; rRNA (ribosomal RNA) essentially makes up the ribosomes; and tRNA (transfer RNA) carries amino acids into the ribosome for synthesis into proteins.
In summary: nucleic acids are made up sugars, phosphate groups, and nitrogenous bases, and their function is to encode, transmit, and express hereditary information. Next article, we’ll take a look at how scientists learned that nucleic acids are the genetic material of life.
Body images sourced from Wikimedia Commons
Further resources: Structure of Nucleic Acids at Educationportal

Basically my entire medicinal module this semester.
#AT2CG3

sciencesoup:

Nucleic Acids

Nucleic acids are the “genetic software” of the cell, allowing organisms to pass on their complex components to the next generation. You might know them better as DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or RNA (ribonucleic acid): the macromolecules responsible for storing and transmitting hereditary information. They’re the reason you have blonde hair, or long fingers, or a gigantic nose. Without them, no organism could produce offspring, so they’re essential for all life.

Nucleic acids are made up of a chain of monomers called nucleotides, which are in turn made up of five-carbon sugars, a nitrogenous base, and one or more phosphate groups. That might seem like an extra level of complication, but we need to know this to understand their structure.

Consider, for example, a DNA molecule:

image

The two strands running down on either side are called the molecule’s “sugar phosphate backbone”, which are connected in the middle by nitrogenous bases that pair up to the adjacent strand.There are four kinds of bases: Adenine and Guanine, which are purines, and Cytosine and Thymine, which are pyrimidines. In RNA, Thymine is replaced with Uracil (a pyrimidine). Purines have two rings and pyrimidines have one ring, so the groupings just refer to structure.

image

(Source)

The bases are almost always shortened to A, G, C, T & U. Their order determines how life is built—they encode a sequence of amino acids, which instruct how proteins are built. We’ll learn more about later.

Nitrogenous bases are hydrophobic, meaning they hate water. This is crucial to the structure of the DNA, because the strands are oriented so the bases face each other rather than the outside world, protecting them from water. The bases pair together using hydrogen bonds—purines always pair with pyrimidines, so A pairs with T (U in RNA), and C with G.  In any given DNA molecule, the amount of A equals the amount of T, and the amount of C equals the amount of G. This is important because it maintains a uniform diameter for the helix of DNA.

image

The person who realised this equality was Austrian biochemist Erwin Chargaff, and he was a contemporary of American biologist James Watson and English physicist Francis Crick, who you might have heard of. In 1953, they were the first to publish the spiralling, double-helix structure of DNA. (See my article on Rosalind Franklin for the reason I’m not a fan of Watson and Crick.)

DNA strands have a polarity, meaning they have a direction—strands are always synthesised from the 5’ (said “five prime”) end to the 3’ end. I’ll talk a whole lot more about how this happens later on. The important thing to know now is that when two strands are connected in a DNA molecule, they run antiparallel, like this:

So, what about an RNA molecule?

For starters, DNA is located in a different place to RNA:

image

RNA only has a single strand, and it’s made from a different sugar: ribose instead of deoxyribose. Basically, this means it has one more OH group). RNA also has a completely different function. While DNA is the blueprint for life, RNA is the guy who actually gets things done. Different types of RNA are specialised for different functons: mRNA (messenger RNA) carries the blueprints between DNA and ribosomes in order to make proteins; rRNA (ribosomal RNA) essentially makes up the ribosomes; and tRNA (transfer RNA) carries amino acids into the ribosome for synthesis into proteins.

In summary: nucleic acids are made up sugars, phosphate groups, and nitrogenous bases, and their function is to encode, transmit, and express hereditary information. Next article, we’ll take a look at how scientists learned that nucleic acids are the genetic material of life.

Body images sourced from Wikimedia Commons

Further resources: Structure of Nucleic Acids at Educationportal

Basically my entire medicinal module this semester.

#AT2CG3

(via shychemist)

bemusedlybespectacled:

do you ever think about the judges for the triwizard tournament trying to figure out who to kidnap for the second task

like they’re all just sitting in dumbledore’s office and karkaroff goes “well word on the street says that krum has a crush on that granger girl”

"damn," says dumbledore, "I wanted harry to rescue her. well, what about the delightful miss chang?"

"no," says bagman, "we’ve got her down for diggory"

"stop sinking my ships," says dumbledore

(via mybeautifulbeautifulponds)

dreaminghermione:

Harry Potter AU in which Fred and George are in different houses and they steal and wear each others ties whilst doing stupid things in hope of the others house losing points

(via thefuryofthenorth)